Overqualified?

Dear RSL,

I’ve applied for multiple jobs and keep being told that I’m “over-qualified” for the position.  I know I have the skills
needed and would do a great job and isn’t someone who has experience doing the same thing preferred?  What does “over-qualified” really mean?

Wow…first day back from vacation and you hit me with a good one!  Being considered “over-qualified” for a position can mean an array of different things.  A lot of it depends on what industry, type of job, etc.  Start by looking at the job description.  After reading the job description and matching it up to what you’ve done and where you currently are at in your career, how does it match up?  Would the position be a lateral move for you, a step back or a step up on the career ladder?  Most likely if you’re being told that you’re over qualified, it would be seen as a step back.

Why are you applying for positions that are a step backwards in your career versus a step up?  Are you not receiving feedback for positions that require experience more in line with where you are at in your career?  Perhaps
it’s time to talk with a resume writer or invest in a resume writing seminar.  Chances are; there is nothing in your resume that is catching the eye of the recruiting and/or hiring manager to make them want to jump at the chance to talk to you.  Are you customizing your resume and cover letter for each specific position?  Are you making sure that keywords and phrases used in the job description show up in your resume?  This is something simple you can do now that will make a huge difference to your future applications.

Getting back to over-qualified and how recruiters use it in communicating with their candidates.  Most times when a recruiter lets a candidate know they’re over qualified, it’s because the position would be a step back.  Even if a  candidate says they’re willing to take a step back it’s still considered a “risky” hire.  Why?  Because past hires have shown that hiring someone that’s overqualified often leads to an employee that’s unhappy in their job, bored and unchallenged.  Most companies are looking for those employees that are looking to continually improve their skills; which in most cases entails moving up within their profession or chosen career path.

If you’re being told why you’re not being hired, use this information to your advantage.  Update your resume.  Start looking for positions that are a better fit for your skill set.  Don’t give up, just tweak your search.

Are you overqualified for the positions you’re applying for?

Resume Survis Lady is written by Billye Survis. To have your resume or job search questions answered by Resume Survis Lady, send your questions to: resumesurvislady@gmail.com

Feel free to also connect with Resume Survis Lady:

Twitter:  resumesurvisldy

LinkedIn:   http://www.linkedin.com/in/billye

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Hundreds Of Resumes And No Response….

Dear RSL,

I’m in the middle of a job search and I have sent out what seems like hundreds of resumes.  Other than a couple of interviews and a handful of emails letting me know I was not being considered, I have not heard
anything.  Is this normal?

Searching for a new position can be daunting and at times a bit frustrating.  You’re doing a lot of work trying to find a new position and would like someone to acknowledge that they’ve at least received your resume.
So why are you not getting a response?  There could be a number of reasons as to why you’re not hearing anything back.  First of all, take a step back and look at the jobs that you are applying for. Look at the job description and what is stated as minimum or basic qualifications.  Do you have the experience and skills that are required for the position?  Or instead of having the qualifications feel that you could do the job and be good at it?  Chances are if you do not have the experience and skills required for the position and instead feel it’s something you’d be good at, only those applicants that do have what the company is looking for will move to step in the process.

Another reason that you might not be getting a response to your resume is because of the sheer number of applicants that are applying.  Take one of the positions that I am currently recruiting on.  It’s an electrical engineer position.  In one day alone I received 25 applications.  It is not unusual for me to be dealing with over 100 applicants or more for a position.   Of the applicants that apply to a position, I will only forward the top candidates to the hiring manager for consideration.  If you’re applying to positions that have a lot of applicants, it might be that your application was received too late to be considered or that there were other applicants more qualified.

While it would be nice to receive some type of notification with every resume that is sent, not all companies are set up to respond to the large number of candidates that have applied.  Also remember that if you haven’t received a response to your resume submittal, it’s okay to follow-up to ensure your application was received and to find out if you’re being considered for the position (https://resumesurvislady.wordpress.com/2011/04/19/help-who-do-i-follow-up-with/).

Resume Survis Lady is written by Billye Survis. To have your resume or job search questions answered by Resume Survis Lady, send your questions to: resumesurvislady@gmail.com

Feel free to also connect with Resume Survis Lady:

Twitter:  resumesurvisldy

LinkedIn: Resume Survis Lady

Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/pages/Resume-Survis-Lady/150368705033497

Do I add a photo to my resume?

Dear Resume Survis Lady,

I was talking to a Professional Resume Writer and he suggested I add a picture to my resume.  I had never heard of this before.  Is this something new and I’m behind the times?

I have started to see more and more resumes come through with pictures on them, however they are still very few and far between on them.  So no, I don’t think you’re behind the times with that one.  My personal opinion regarding photos on resumes is to save the photos for your LinkedIn profile but leave them off your resume.  Why?  I left my opinion out of it as I posted this question in one of the many Recruiting groups I belong to on LinkedIn. What I found was the responses I received echoed my own thoughts on the matter.

Before I get into the reasons, I just want to remind everyone that I am NOT an attorney.  Now that we have that business out of the way, let’s talk about why there should not be pictures on resumes.  The first reason you will want to leave your picture off your resume is because most electronic means by which you will be submitting your resume for a position will not be able to read the photo and will instead replace it with gibberish.  When your resume is read electronically and comes across something it cannot interpret, it turns that into a bunch of symbols, numbers and letters which in turn takes out the formatting of your resume and makes it very difficult for the person on the other end of the resume.  If the recruiter or hiring manager cannot read your resume, they will not be able to give your resume proper consideration.

The second reason you will want to leave your picture off of your resume is that if it does make it intact through an electronic applicant tracking system, your resume might not be looked at due to the fear of discrimination based on what you look like.   Again, I am NOT an attorney.  If you submit a resume with your picture on it, there could be pre conceived notions about age, race, etc.    So, if it’s notice during the application process that there is a picture file attached, they will not open or consider the resume to avoid what could be perceived by others as a bias.

So why is a picture okay on LinkedIn but not on a Resume?  The answer might surprise you.  A LinkedIn profile is not considered an  application however a resume that’s been submitted for a position is considered to be expressing interest in the position.  In simpler terms, it’s the difference between being an applicant and being a social networker.

Bottom line, leave the photos off your resume and instead put them to good use on your LinkedIn profile for networking purposes.

To have your resume or job search questions answered by Resume Survis Lady, or have her help you with your resume, email her at: resumesurvislady@gmail.com or on twitter: resumesurvisldy or connect with her directly on LinkedIn by sending her an invite to connect: resumesurvislady@gmail.com

Help!!! Who do I follow up with?

Dear Resume Survis Lady,

I’m totally confused at this point on how and who to follow-up with directly after filling out an application and submitting a resume online.   Aside from following-up with HR to be sure they have your information, what advice can you give on taking it a step further?

Finding out who the hiring manager is and following-up directly with that person seems to be logical, but isn’t always the best scenario. I’ve had some people react very badly (rude and abrupt reaction to a direct call) and that has kind of made me think twice about this approach.

This is a great question and one I get often.  I hear from many clients that they have been told to find out who the hiring manager or decision maker is regarding the position they have applied to and contact them directly.  From my experience working with hiring managers, this is only a good idea if you either know the hiring manager personally or if you have a direct connection to the hiring manager through a friend or acquaintance.  Typically, hiring managers are extremely busy and don’t like dealing with tasks that they consider to be “HR’s” responsibility and that includes communication with candidates and status updates. 

Candidates that have interviewed for a position are a different story.  If you’ve already had an interview with the hiring manager, it’s completely acceptable, in fact I encourage for you to follow up with the hiring manager by sending a Thank You note after your interview thanking them for their time and letting them know your interest level in the position.  Now days, in the age of technology, it’s completely acceptable to  send a Thank You note via email if you have their email address or via professional networking such as LinkedIn.  Once the Thank You note has been sent, your next follow up is with the recruiter or the person that made the initial contact with you for the position.

I got sidetracked, back to the original question of who to follow up with.  If you’ve submitted your resume/application and have not heard anything back after 1-2 weeks, it is acceptable to follow up with the HR department/recruiter to make sure that your application has been received and to ask where your resume is at in the process.  During this initial follow up, I would also ask the recruiter if for future communication they prefer to communicate via email or the phone.  A rule of thumb with this is that if the recruiter’s initial contact with you is via email, they probably prefer to communicate via email and if their initial contact is via phone, they probably prefer phone.  Moving forward, you’ll know which method of communication to use with them.

To have your resume or job search questions answered by Resume Survis Lady, send your questions to: resumesurvislady@gmail.com or on twitter: resumesurvisldy or connect with her directly on LinkedIn by sending her an invite to connect:  resumesurvislady@gmail.com

Addresses on resumes?

Dear Resume Survis Lady,

With everyone using the internet to submit their resume and email to communicate, is it necessary to put my full street address on my resume?

I have to say, this is a question I have never been asked before in my 10+ years of resume writing and recruiting.  I have always included full addresses on resumes that I have written, so I needed to do a bit of research before I felt I could answer this question.

I went through and read everything I could on the pros and cons of including the full address on a resume.  It really is a personal call as to if this information should be included or not.  After I finished reading up on the matter, I asked some hiring managers what their thoughts were regarding addresses on a resume, but more on hiring manager’s views in a moment.  First I will address the cons of including addresses on resumes.

The biggest negative I could find with including addresses is around privacy.  If the resume was to fall into the wrong hands, there’s the possibility that their privacy and/or security could be breached.  I have to admit, the only resumes I have ever seen without an address are those received from an agency recruiter who doesn’t want me to contact the candidate without their knowledge.  The second negative I found was that including the street address on a resume could be seen as being outdated, not technically up to date and instead just be sure to include cell phone, email and LinkedIn profile addresses.  The final con that I was able to find was for candidates that want to relocate to where the position is located and do not want to be removed from the applicant pool based on where they currently live.

By including an address on a resume, you are providing the recruiter and hiring manager a complete picture.  When there are pieces missing off of a resume that are usually there, I start to think that the candidate is trying to hide something and there resume gets extra scrutiny.   I also spoke with a few different hiring managers regarding their views of including or excluding addresses on a resume.  What the overwhelming consensus was is that they want to see the address on the resume.  Without that address, many hours could be spent on the candidate before realizing that relocation might be needed or that the candidate is interviewing with the hope that they will be able to work remote within a few months of starting.

I’m curious as to your thoughts.  Do you currently have your address included on your resume?  Until I have a compelling reason not to, I am going to continue including addresses on the resumes I write for my clients.

To have your resume or job search questions answered by Resume Survis Lady, send your questions to: resumesurvislady@gmail.com or on twitter: resumesurvisldy