Keywords, Keywords and More Keywords!!!

Dear Resume Survis Lady,

It’s been a long time since I’ve needed to update my resume and I’m sure there have been a lot of changes with how to format a resume and what you need to put on it.  I want to maximize the number of times my resume is reviewed and I’ve heard adding keywords are the way to do it.  What are keywords and how do I incorporate them into my resume? 

Ahhh….keywords!  I love keywords!  First of all let me start by explaining what keywords are for those who may not know.  Most resumes are now submitted and stored electronically.  This would include resumes that you upload to a job board such as CareerBuilder or Monster or a profile that you have created online on a site such as LinkedIn.  For most positions you apply to, you will also be applying online through what is known as a company’s “Applicant Tracking System” or ATS for short.  This would be when you visit a company’s career website and apply to a position that
is listed on their site.  All electronic databases have the ability to search the resumes stored through entering keywords or search strings.  Think of it like a search engine such as Google.  If you go to the Google home page to search for a specific product or specific information, you would enter your search string of keywords and hit enter to see your results.  It’s the same with electronic resume banks.  A potential employer can use a search feature to enter specific keywords of things they are looking for.  This could be something like CPM (Certified Purchasing Manager) to PE (Plant Engineer) to Automation experience, etc.

So, should you use keywords in your resume?  ABSOLUTELY! One of the biggest mistakes I see with resumes that are not professionally written is the absence of keywords.  A great example of this is when you list your employment history.  Do you have the industry listed or what each company does? This is an area that is often overlooked when writing a resume.  If a recruiter is looking for someone who has experience in the “specialty chemical” arena, they will often use keywords like: Chem, specialty chemical, specialty chem, chemical.  If you do not have it listed in your resume,
your resume will not be pulled back.

There are different ways that you can include keywords into your resume.  The first would be to include them in the body of your resume as you are writing it.  Enter a short “blurb” about the company after you list it on your resume such as:

XYZ Company, Milwaukee, WI                                                                                                 4/2006-11/2010

XYZ Company is a Recruitment Process
Outsourcing (RPO) company known as a global pioneer of innovative and uniquely
effective talent sourcing and strategy for its clients.

 You can also create a keyword section at the bottom of your resume where you can list in succession all the keywords that are not already listed in your resume:

Manage, Strategic, automation, DCS

There is no limit as to how many keywords you can add to your resume.  Just make sure that the keywords you enter are relevant to your experience.  The goal of submitting any resume electronically; be it to a job board or through an ATS for a position that you are applying to, is to have your resume reviewed.  Having keywords in your resume will help to ensure your resume is not overlooked during the initial screening process.

What has been your experience with keywords?

Resume Survis Lady is written by Billye Survis. To have your resume or job search questions answered by Resume Survis Lady, send your
questions to: resumesurvislady@gmail.com

Feel free to also connect with Resume Survis Lady:

Twitter:  resumesurvisldy

LinkedIn: Resume Survis Lady

Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/pages/Resume-Survis-Lady/150368705033497

 

 

 

Hundreds Of Resumes And No Response….

Dear RSL,

I’m in the middle of a job search and I have sent out what seems like hundreds of resumes.  Other than a couple of interviews and a handful of emails letting me know I was not being considered, I have not heard
anything.  Is this normal?

Searching for a new position can be daunting and at times a bit frustrating.  You’re doing a lot of work trying to find a new position and would like someone to acknowledge that they’ve at least received your resume.
So why are you not getting a response?  There could be a number of reasons as to why you’re not hearing anything back.  First of all, take a step back and look at the jobs that you are applying for. Look at the job description and what is stated as minimum or basic qualifications.  Do you have the experience and skills that are required for the position?  Or instead of having the qualifications feel that you could do the job and be good at it?  Chances are if you do not have the experience and skills required for the position and instead feel it’s something you’d be good at, only those applicants that do have what the company is looking for will move to step in the process.

Another reason that you might not be getting a response to your resume is because of the sheer number of applicants that are applying.  Take one of the positions that I am currently recruiting on.  It’s an electrical engineer position.  In one day alone I received 25 applications.  It is not unusual for me to be dealing with over 100 applicants or more for a position.   Of the applicants that apply to a position, I will only forward the top candidates to the hiring manager for consideration.  If you’re applying to positions that have a lot of applicants, it might be that your application was received too late to be considered or that there were other applicants more qualified.

While it would be nice to receive some type of notification with every resume that is sent, not all companies are set up to respond to the large number of candidates that have applied.  Also remember that if you haven’t received a response to your resume submittal, it’s okay to follow-up to ensure your application was received and to find out if you’re being considered for the position (https://resumesurvislady.wordpress.com/2011/04/19/help-who-do-i-follow-up-with/).

Resume Survis Lady is written by Billye Survis. To have your resume or job search questions answered by Resume Survis Lady, send your questions to: resumesurvislady@gmail.com

Feel free to also connect with Resume Survis Lady:

Twitter:  resumesurvisldy

LinkedIn: Resume Survis Lady

Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/pages/Resume-Survis-Lady/150368705033497

Who Do I List As My References?

Dear RSL,

I am going to my second on site interview for a position I really want.  The company has asked me for a list of references.  Should I include personal references, peer references, managers or a combination?  What types of questions does a company ask a reference?

Great question!  A company asking for references is a good sign! When you are preparing your list of references, it’s always good to have a combination of people including at least two people who you have directly reported to as well as one or two peers.  There really is no need to add a personal reference unless it is an entry-level position or a first position.

To answer your next question as to what to types of questions a company asks references; that depends upon the company and what type of position you are applying for. Generally, the questions will revolve around work ethic, attendance, reason for leaving, ability to be rehired, etc.

Do you know what your references will say about you? Although my current position does not include conducting reference checks, I have conducted plenty of reference checks in my past.  What always amazed me is those candidates who give me a list of references and one or two people on their list give them a
terrible reference.   Have a conversation with them before adding them to your reference list.  Ask them what they are going to say about you.  Don’t just assume that they are going to give you a glowing reference.  If you’re not sure what they’re going to say when called by a potential employer, don’t include them on your reference list.

Resume Survis Lady is written by Billye Survis. To have your resume or job search questions answered by Resume Survis Lady, send your questions to: resumesurvislady@gmail.com

Feel free to also connect with Resume Survis Lady:

Twitter:  resumesurvisldy

LinkedIn: Resume Survis Lady or www.linkedin.com/in/billye

Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/pages/Resume-Survis-Lady/150368705033497

Do I Want To Be An Open Networker On LinkedIn?

Dear RSL,

I see you are a member of an open networking group on LinkedIn. I joined that group partly because I
saw you there.  I’ve also joined some other open networking groups, but many of them seem so “spammy” and it seems like all a lot of them do is promote connection invites. I’m not getting the point of that unless that’s the only purpose.  So… which groups do you belong to and why?

You’re right; I am an open networker on LinkedIn.  What that means is that I accept all invites sent to me.  As for the open networking groups, their primary purpose is for open networkers to grow their networkers
and connect with other “like minded” open networkers or LIONS (LinkedIn Open Networkers).  I started off on LinkedIn about 5 years ago and from the start I have been an open networker.  There are different schools of thought on open networker with some wanting to only connect with people that they know personally, others want to only connect with others in their area of expertise and others like myself who will accept invites from anyone.

Why am I an open networker?  As a recruiter the biggest part of my job is building relationships and networking.  Over the years I have recruited professionals with a wide array of skill sets.  By being an open networker I have been able to not only connect with people as first connections, but by connecting it also allows me to be able to contact their connections if I want to.  So, it may not be my direct connection I’m looking to recruit or network with, but their connection.

As for the different groups that I am in on LinkedIn and why, I am in a number of different groups and they primarily fall into 3 categories.  The first category contains groups that are related to the types of positions that I’m recruiting for at the moment.  These categories will change periodically and you will notice at the moment they are focused primarily on Engineering and IT.

The second set of groups that I belong to on LinkedIn is centered around my resume writing business so you will notice that I belong to a few groups for Resume Writers.  These groups allow me to connect with others in my industry where we exchange ideas and ask each other’s questions.   I also belong to various job seekers groups and HR groups.

The third set of groups that I belong to on LinkedIn is related to my blogging.  These groups are for people like me who keep up with a blog and enjoy writing

To make LinkedIn Groups work for you is to determine what it is you want to do on LinkedIn and from there join appropriate groups.

 

Resume Survis Lady is written by Billye Survis. To have your resume or job search questions answered by RSL, send your questions to: resumesurvislady@gmail.com

Other ways to connect with RSL:

Twitter:  resumesurvisldy

LinkedIn: Resume Survis Lady

Facebookhttps://www.facebook.com/pages/Resume-Survis-Lady/150368705033497

Ok To Contact A Headhunter?

Dear RSL,

I’m just getting started in my job search.  I’m currently working and happy with where I am at but I’ve reached the top of where I can go in this company.  I’m thinking about working with a “head hunter” to help me find a new position.  Is this a good idea?

Absolutely it’s a good idea!  When you’re in a job search there’s nothing wrong with exploring your options and having others help you to find the next step in your career.  For those of you not familiar with what a “head hunter” is, a “head hunter” can also be called an “executive recruiter” or “third party recruiter.”  If you have not yet had a chance to read the guest blog by Todd Nilsen, “Know Your Recruiter: The Specialized World of Third Party Recruiting” (http://wp.me/p1rGgF-1d) I highly suggest you read it.  Todd offers some great insight into Executive Recruiters/Head Hunters.

While I don’t think there’s anything wrong with working with a head hunter, there are a few things you will want to consider in choosing who you ultimately partner with.  Do your research.  If you’re looking to be in a specific industry or within a specific vertical, look for recruiters that specialize in those areas.  Ask the recruiters which companies they have contacts with and what types of positions they have placed with them in the past.  Most
importantly remember that you are not the only candidate they are working with.  You will want to continue to network with others and search on your own as well.

When you are working with a head hunter, it’s important to note that most companies will always try to fill positions on their own first.  Because of this, if there are specific companies that you are interested in working for try to network with others at that company.  You can network with them through networking sites and various networking events (these can be both virtual or in person).  There are a tremendous number of positions that are filled through networking and no one knows your background, qualifications and future goals better than yourself.

Go ahead, call that headhunter.  Just don’t forget that they are only a small part of your search solution.

Resume Survis Lady is written by Billye Survis. To have your resume or job search questions answered by Resume Survis Lady, send your questions to: resumesurvislady@gmail.com
Feel free to also connect with Resume Survis Lady through twitter:  resumesurvisldy her LinkedIn group: Resume Survis Lady and on Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/pages/Resume-Survis-Lady/150368705033497

What Do Recruiters Look At When Looking At LinkedIn Profiles?

Dear RSL,

I hear you mention LinkedIn quite often, that you use it to recruit people.  What do recruiters look for when they are looking at people’s LinkedIn profiles?

You’re right; I do use LinkedIn very heavily!  What can I say; it’s been a great recruiting tool for me to find great candidates.  It’s also worked out very well for me as my profile on LinkedIn has led to 2 jobs finding me.

LinkedIn is a tool that should be used by all job seekers.  Think of the profile you create as a ‘casual’ resume.  What I mean by that is you will still want to have all of the relevant information contained in your resume as part of your LinkedIn profile including work experience, significant accomplishments and education but you also are able to be more casual with things like your summary.  For example, in my summary I state that in addition to being a recruiter/resume writer/blogger that I am also a superhero wife and mother 24/7.  Now that might make you laugh, but
quite often I will get comments on it and people remember who I am.  Just today I received an email to connect with the person requesting the connection saying they always wanted to know a superhero.

In addition to the typical “resume info” you will want to make sure that your LinkedIn profile is 100% completed to increase your visibility to those looking for people with your skill set.  This will include making sure you have a summary, list specialties, have contact information and references and belong to LinkedIn groups.  LinkedIn gives preference to those users who complete their profile by listing them higher in the rankings during searches and enable more people to find you.

As a recruiter I look at the groups that people belong to. I like to know that people I am recruiting are active networkers with others in their chosen profession.  It’s always good to show that you are keeping up on current industry standards and I think that belonging to and contributing to appropriate groups is extremely important for not only potential employers to see but to also network with others in your field.

Bottom line with LinkedIn: make sure you include all of your career history/education and include personal referrals.  If you don’t currently have any referrals, ask current and former colleagues/managers/clients if they will write a referral for you.  Make sure your profile is 100% completed.  If you’re interested in what a completed profile looks like, feel free to view mine:  www.linkedin.com/in/billye  Also make sure you have joined groups appropriate for your profession and are active in them.

Lastly, let me know if you have any questions and how it’s working for you.  Good luck!

Resume Survis Lady is written by Billye Survis. To have your resume or job search questions answered by Resume Survis Lady, send your
questions to: resumesurvislady@gmail.com Feel free to also connect with Resume Survis Lady through twitter:  resumesurvisldy her LinkedIn group: Resume Survis Lady and on Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/pages/Resume-Survis-Lady/150368705033497

I’m Still 29… How Old Are You?

Dear Resume Survis Lady,

I am an “older” professional that has been displaced and have found myself unexpectedly in the job market.  I am worried that my age is going to hinder my ability to get a job.  What do I do if they ask me how old I am?

Before I answer this question, let me just start with a disclaimer that I am not an attorney or am I an expert on employment law.   Now that I have that out of the way we can get back to the question.  First of all, it is illegal for an employer or potential employer to discriminate against
someone due to age.  A “Best Practice” for industries is to avoid any questions that could be construed as trying to determine the age of the candidate.  This can include questions such as “What year did you graduate?” or “When did you go to college?”  The job interview should be
focused on previous experience, job skills and future goals.

Best practices aside, I have heard stories from others in the job market that they have been asked during the course of an interview how old they are, so I’m not going to say that it’s never going to happen.  What I can tell you is that age discrimination can be extremely hard to prove and the burden of proof would fall on you to prove that discrimination existed.  What you will need to decide if asked a question that is perceived as trying to determine your age is: what is the intent the question is being asked with?  Are they trying to purposely use your age to
discriminate?  And if they are, are they a company that you would want to work for?  But you’re not asking how to determine if age discrimination occurred or how to prove age discrimination so I’ll leave that one for the labor lawyers.

Back to what you should do if you’re asked how old you are.  It’s really quite simple.  If someone asked me how old I was during an interview, I would reply, with a smile on my face: “I’m still 29, how old are you?”

Resume Survis Lady is written by Billye Survis. To have your resume or job search questions answered by Resume Survis Lady, send your
questions to: resumesurvislady@gmail.com Feel free to also connect with Resume Survis Lady through twitter:  resumesurvisldy her LinkedIn group: Resume Survis Lady and on Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/pages/Resume-Survis-Lady/150368705033497

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